Buddy Statements in Veteran Affairs’ Disability Claims

Buddy Statements in Veteran Affairs’ Disability Claims

When a veteran files a disability claim with the Department of Veterans’ Affairs, it is often a wise idea to supplement this claim with a “buddy statement” or “statement in support of claim” that substantiates the type of event that caused the veteran’s disability as well as where the event occurred. A knowledgeable attorney can help a veteran navigate issues concerning a disability claim as well as present as strong a case as possible to make sure that the veteran receives benefits.

VA Personality Disorder Disabilities

VA Personality Disorder Disabilities

The Veteran’s Affairs Office diagnoses many veterans with personality disorders. A personality disorder, however, is not a recognized disability by the Veteran’s Affairs Office. In situations where a veteran’s behavior becomes abnormal or erratic, military physicians often diagnose a veteran with a personality disorder so that claims can be denied. In situations involving veterans with personality disorders, it is frequently a wise idea to retain the assistance of legal counsel to help make sure that disability benefits are awarded.

VA Form 21-4138

VA Form 21-4138

If the Veteran’s Affairs Office sends a veteran a request for additional information to support a claim or a more detailed explanation of an element in a person’s claim, the veteran file a Statement in Support of Claim or VA-Form 21-4138. These statements frequently include or describe the evidence that supports a veteran’s claim. While these documents are not required to be a certain length or format, Form 21-4138 is frequently used to explain why certain documentation is missing in a military record or offer a statement from a family member or friend regarding the severity of a veteran’s

Decision Review Officer Hearings

Decision Review Officer Hearings

A Decision Review Officer (DRO) is an employee of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs who review certain types of appeals concerning veterans’ disability benefits. Obtaining a DRO review is much faster than appeal to the Bureau of Veterans Affairs. In handling a decision review officer hearing, however, individuals frequently find it essential to retain the assistance of skilled legal counsel.

Total Disability based on Individual Unemployability (TDIU) Claims

Total Disability based on Individual Unemployability (TDIU) Claims

Many  veterans experience conditions that significantly interfere with work but do not satisfy the Veterans’ Affairs definition of 100 percent disability. In these cases, Total Disability based on Individual Unemployability (TDIU) or Individual Unemployability (IU) claims provide the same types of compensation as 100 percent disability ratings to veterans when a veteran’s disability does not add up to 100 percent.

VA Compensation Pension Exam

VA Compensation Pension Exam

The VA Compensation Pension Exam is a routine part of the Veteran’s Administration claims process. In some cases, individuals who have more than one injury or illness might even need to attend a Compensation and Pension Exam for each individual health condition.

VA Disability Benefit's Appeals

VA Disability Benefit's Appeals

In March of 2017, the Government Accountability Office released a report titled “VA Disability Benefits: Additional Planning Would Enhance Efforts to Improve the Timelines of Appeals Decisions”. This report addresses the Veteran Administration efforts to reform the appeals process by focusing on potential improvements to the Board of Veterans Appeals. The Government Accountability Office’s report was critical of the process related to appeals for VA disability benefits attempts to implement changes to the appeal process. According to the Veteran Administration, in 2015 more than 417,000

Compensation vs Pension Benefits for Veterans

Compensation vs Pension Benefits for Veterans

 Veterans who file a claim for benefits should understand the difference between compensation vs pension. Once an individual understands this difference, it is easier to understand what kind of benefits an individual desires and the process required in order to obtain these benefits. It is also often very important for individuals who seek compensation to obtain the assistance of a skilled veteran’s rights attorney.

Individual Unemployability

Individual Unemployability

VA disability compensation can be a tricky thing. Nearly all veterans are aware that they may qualify for compensation for injuries suffered or aggravated by their service. But many veterans are unaware that they may qualify to be paid at a 100% disability rate (the current effective rate pays $2,915.55 per month) for service-connected disabilities that inhibit them from securing a “substantially gainful occupation,” regardless of whether they are 100% service connected. This is known as Total Disability Ratings Based on Individual Unemployability of the Individual, or TDIU for short.

Veterans Disability Private Medical Opinion

Veterans Disability Private Medical Opinion

In a large number of veteran disability claims, a case can be significantly bolstered if a private strong medical opinion letter is provided by a treating physician. A direct service connection can often be shown if a veteran presents the Veterans Affairs office with a strong medical opinion that details the veteran’s current medical condition. These letters must meet several requirements to be as strong as possible including presenting medical evidence of the veteran’s injury and a description of how this condition was connected to service in the military. There are other vital details

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