Easing the Pain of Divorce - Allocating Parental Duties

Easing the Pain of Divorce - Allocating Parental Duties

Divorce can be difficult and emotional, especially if there are children involved.  Parents must make complicated decisions regarding physical custody, parenting time, decision-making and financial responsibility.. Parenting in divorce can be difficult to navigate, and it is often helpful to consult with a lawyer for an explanation of legal rights and responsibilities.

Protection Orders 101

Protection Orders 101

If you are a victim of domestic abuse and need protection from your abuser, a county court can award you a civil Protection Order against the offending party. Don't be ashamed to seek help because domestic abuse crosses all genders, races, ethnic groups and socio-economic classes. If you require protection, please seek immediate assistance in obtaining a TPO and later a PPO.

Child Support Modification 101

Child Support Modification 101

An initial child support order may not last forever. Incomes and expenses often change over the years, as do the needs of children. Once ordered, child support continues at the set rate unless another support order is entered. Financial changes do not result in an automatic support adjustment. It is necessary to request an adjustment through the court by submitting a motion to modify a support order. Alternatively the parties can agree to modify the initial order and request that a court issue the agreement as a modified order.

Military Retirement Pay and Divorce can be a painful

Military Retirement Pay and Divorce can be a painful

A new way of thinking about Military Retirement Pay? Disposable Retired Pay? Think again. Divorce is a painful, messy and sometimes unavoidable, necessary part of life. Some couples accumulate considerable assets that can be the focus of contentious negotiations ending up in even more contentious litigation. The asset division process can even be more complicated when military retirement pay (MRP) is the asset being divided. A couple in Arizona found this out recently in a case decided on May 19, 2019 by the Arizona Supreme Court in Barron v. Barron, No. CV-18-0234-PR, 440 P.3d 1136